• Custom Tank Background

    Check it out!

    http://www.firedupgeckos.com/do-it-yourself/custom-tank-background/

    We’re very excited to announce that completion of the custom tank background tutorial! The background was created for the winner of the custom tank background giveaway at our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/firedupgeckos. We hope she likes it.

    Since we were making a background, we thought it would be a great opportunity to create another Do It Yourself  Tutorial ( http://www.firedupgeckos.com/do-it-yourself/ )

    As always, the full tutorial is on our site, but here’s a visual summary.

    Enjoy!

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  • Jackson, the Beardie, and his new Weirdy Beardie Hammock

    Although, we’re a mostly gecko household, Jack was a beardie that we just couldn’t turn down. Jack is a grumpy little guy. He reminds me mostly of an old man stuck in a lizards body. We love him for it. He’s a great little beastie.

    Three years ago, that was not the case. Three years ago, two things happened very close to each other. First, we both lost our jobs. A week later, my dad asked if I could take his friend’s beardie because, “her cat was bothering it.”

    I didn’t really have the money to take on another animal, but I agreed to go look at him. When we, my roommate and I, got to house. We encountered a 95 gram, one year old bearded dragon who was so weak he couldn’t walk. He had never had dusted crickets or correct lighting and heating. He was chewed on my the dozens of crickets that his owner would just dump in the cage.

    We agreed to take him on the spot. We were convinced he was going to die within the month, but Jack is a tough little guy. We got him eating again. At first, he couldn’t really use his back legs, and he’d drag himself a long with this front legs. This earned him the nickname, “Sluggy”. We kept at it though, and soon he was walking. Soon after that, he started jumping. He can jump a few inches now. He likes to perch on the arm of the couch sometimes.

    This is Sluggy after 4 months of TLC at our home.

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    Here’s Sluggy, about 3 years after.

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    He’s enjoying his brand new hammock from Weirdy Beardie Hammocks

    We met Maddy Judkins, from Weirdy Beardie Hammocks, at the Manchester Reptile Expo. Her hammocks are durable, soft, and very affordable.  She offers many colorful patterns and prints on her hammocks as well. We like a more natural look, so when we asked her if her had any that were dirt colored, she added the grommets to this one on the spot for us. Jack can hop right onto his.

    Thanks Maddy!

  • Everglades!

    Three years ago, my mom wanted to do Florida vacations with her girls. My sister and her went shopping and had a great time. I got laid off multiple times, and went through a rather rough time. However, it finally happened, swamps and all! Here are some ramblings for people to read. (I never travel anywhere, by the way.)

    I find it amusing that many people think my love of reptiles and streams is a new hobby of mine. I got my first two anoles as a First Communion present. I was 9. My parents had a summer house in Marlow, NH. I think about 90% of my free time was spent along the bank of a stream, observing reptiles, amphibians, and fish. I loved those moments. Out of all the memories of my childhood, those are some of my favorites, and no one but myself was there for them. They’re special in that regard. Because of this, the Everglades has been my number one National Park to see, since I was very young. I wanted to see it so badly, that I was almost afraid it would disappoint, like watching He-Man when you’re 30.

    Maybe the most interesting part of the Everglades was how foreign it was. I walk around a forest in New England like I own the place. I know that bird, that mammal, those fish, that tree. I have always known them. I have seen just about every documentary on the Everglades but when stepped onto a path in the Everglades, I was totally out of my element. It was awesome, the real definition of awesome.

    Documentaries only focus in the broad picture, but never captured the nuisances of the place. I knew about mangroves, I didn’t know there was three kinds: red, white, and black, all with different survival mechanisms. I never realized how the water channels in the Everglades twist and turn like an unconquerable labyrinth, and that dense mangrove swamps can give way to vast, flat saw grass meadows in a just a few yards. I knew there were anoles, I didn’t know there was many kinds, or that I could get so close to them. I knew about birds, but I had never walked up on ten huge vultures eating dead gar fish from a dried up pool. They came up to my knee at least and weren’t afraid of me at all. I didn’t know there were enormous crabs with blue legs all over the waterways and I was also unaware that there are 4 inch long orange grasshoppers that just sort out hang out in the paths. I didn’t know a baby alligator feels like it is made out of rubber. I didn’t know how easy it was to get dehydrated. It was unpleasant, but interesting that it could happen so quickly. The hot breezes trick you into thinking you’re not sweating that badly.

    I saw a snake emerge from the weeds and hunt tiny fish. I knew the snake looked very similar to the harmless Northern Water Snake. I knew it could possibly be a harmless southern version of the same snake. However, there was that tiniest bit of doubt and fear that made me decide to not get close to him. I saw a baby manatee emerge from the water about three feet away from me. He was the size of a coffee table, and the slowest moving animal I’d ever encountered. The adults looked about car sized. I learned that Floridians idea of “buggy” is 3 flies on a path. The second day, I didn’t even bother with bug spray.

    In short, it was dirty, swampy, hot, and filled with creatures and plants. It was the dry season, my favorite time to see any place since water hides a great deal of detail, and it was everything I ever hoped it would be. Next, time I’m renting a canoe.

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  • New Tutorial! Magnet Name Tags

    Hi All, I have added a new section in my Do It Yourself category. I’m working on making it a useful resource for all gecko related crafts, so if there’s something else you’d like to see, please request it here and I’ll see if I can get a tutorial up.

    http://www.firedupgeckos.com/do-it-y…net-name-tags/

    As usual, the nice and neat version is on my site, and the quick and dirty version is here:

     

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    Our geckos tend to move around a lot. Is the female in with the male right now? Did I put that little one into their adult cage yet? I just re-arranged my rack to make more room, what order are they in now? All the baby tubs look exactly alike! There are dozens of scenarios. After a long day at work, sometimes I’m worried that I might forget where someone is.

    I came up with a way to solve it once and for all: magnet name tags. Now, the name tag moves with the gecko and it only takes a glance to see who living in what cage. It’s so simple (and water resistant) too!

    Materials
    Black sharpie
    Silver sharpie
    Assorted magnets (I got them at Target)
    Rubbing alcohol (to remove the ink)

    1) Simply write your gecko’s name on one magnet in the color of your choice.

    2) If you don’t like it, clean the name off with the alcohol and start over. I’ve also used the alcohol to erase the name after I’ve sold a gecko but wanted to make a new name tag for a different animal. *Note: the silver is a bit tricky at times and requires a lot of elbow grease; the black comes off easily. ( I bet Goof Off would get it all off without issues, but it also smells really bad, so you’d need to wash the magnet a lot afterwards).

    3) Stick them to either the metal part of a screen lid or use another magnet on the opposite side to secure it to screen, tubs, PVC, plexi etc.

    4) Another useful thing we do with them is stick a geckos weight at a certain date right on the cage.

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  • Meet Scarlet!

    This little beauty came from Dream Catching Geckos (formerly PS Pythons: www.facebook.com/PSPythons). Dream Catching Geckos is located in NH and has a wonderful selection; please check them out!

    She used to be called Gonzo, but we’ve decided to change her name to Scarlet, due to her amazing coloration! We’re so very excited to work with this one in the future!

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